The Mini Harley-Davidson Panhead engine actually works; Epic sounds

Anyone who collects things probably knows the urge to find tiny versions of big things. Even better is when the small version is functional. That’s what makes this tiny 9cc Harley-Davidson Panhead engine so cool. It works and sounds almost like the real thing!

Swinging a leg on a real Panhead these days is not cheap, and some of these bikes run more than a new Harley. But if the Panhead appeals to you but you don’t have $30,000 to drop on a vintage Harley, our friends at RideApart find a compelling alternative. You can buy a small V-twin that looks and sounds like the real deal!

The Harley-Davidson Panhead engine was released in 1948. It replaced the Knucklehead and ran until 1965 when it was replaced by the Shovelhead. If you don’t like old Harleys, don’t worry because I’ve got you covered. These engines get their name from the appearance of their rocker arms. In this case, they look like pie pans. As cycle world Remarks, these motors are renowned for their longevity. Harley-Davidson started a Mileage Club where riders logging over 100,000 miles began to accumulate.

This little V-twin is called the Cison FG-VT9.

Image for article titled This Little Harley-Davidson Panhead Engine Almost Looks Like the Real Deal

Photo: Stirling pencil case

The engine description on the Mini Stirling Engine Kit website calls it Harley’s Panhead and notes a high level of detail. Indeed, looking at that video up there, it looks and even looks like a Panhead, just small enough to fit in the palm of your hand.

The Panhead pickup is made from CNC machined aluminum with copper exhaust elbows, anodized block and chrome rocker arms.

Image for article titled This Little Harley-Davidson Panhead Engine Almost Looks Like the Real Deal

Things are pretty neat on the performance side. It’s fed by a proper little carburettor, each cylinder gets two valves and the 9cc V-twin can spin up to 8,000 rpm. That’s more than my Buell! This results in 0.8 horsepower and it even runs on gasoline.

It would be really nice in a remote control vehicle, but honestly I want to buy one and put it on a stand.

Image for article titled This Little Harley-Davidson Panhead Engine Almost Looks Like the Real Deal

Photo: Stirling pencil case

Or maybe I can do some hijinks like hooking it up to a fan, motorized toothbrush, or generator. Oh, and as a fair warning, don’t snoop around Stirling Kit’s site too long. The place is full of great small motors who are actually running around, all threatening to drain your bank account.

The only downside I could find to this thing is the price. AT around $600 it’s an expensive gift for yourself or the motorcyclist in your life. But heck, it sure is better to have just another non-working model engine!

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