Old timers – Vintage Type http://vintagetype.com/ Tue, 22 Nov 2022 04:21:19 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://vintagetype.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/05/cropped-icon-32x32.png Old timers – Vintage Type http://vintagetype.com/ 32 32 Water Temperature and Trout Behavior https://vintagetype.com/water-temperature-and-trout-behavior/ Tue, 22 Nov 2022 03:30:23 +0000 https://vintagetype.com/water-temperature-and-trout-behavior/ Water Temperature and Trout Behavior by David Moate Trout behavior is affected by all-natural elements or events surrounding each fish. These events change all the time, requiring appropriate responses from the trout to survive. Water is a very sensitive medium, relaying smell, temperature, barometric pressure, vibration and sound (three times faster) faster and more efficiently […]]]>

Water Temperature and Trout Behavior by David Moate

Trout behavior is affected by all-natural elements or events surrounding each fish. These events change all the time, requiring appropriate responses from the trout to survive. Water is a very sensitive medium, relaying smell, temperature, barometric pressure, vibration and sound (three times faster) faster and more efficiently than air. Trout also responds quickly to these messages. Here’s a look at some of the secrets of water temperature and trout behavior.

Water temperature and barometric pressure have profound effects on trout, altering day-to-day lifestyles, annual life cycles and species distributions.

The optimum water temperature for trout is 14 degrees Celsius with a comfort range of 10 degrees to 18 degrees. Below 10 degrees, the trout’s metabolism slows down, making the fish sluggish or numb. Above 20 degrees, lower dissolved oxygen levels slow trout activity. Above 23 degrees trout become stressed, while at temperatures around 25 degrees they may die.

Therefore, trout are constantly moving to find preferred temperatures and/or better temperature-influenced feeding situations.

Brown trout can generally tolerate wider temperature ranges than rainbows. Winter water temperatures affect trout distribution more than summer temperatures, with browns spawning in waters below 10 degrees and rainbows in slightly warmer waters.

Water temperature affects the entire ecosystem, influencing plant growth, insect behavior and distribution, and the levels of chemicals and oxygen in the water. For example, cold water limits plant growth and chemical uptake, but can hold more dissolved oxygen. Warmer water promotes plant growth and carries less dissolved oxygen, but more nutrients and suspended solids.

A few years ago I started keeping accurate records of water and air temperatures, locations and behavior of trout. Most of these 900 fly fishing days were recorded in the Nelson, Marlborough and West Coast areas, but all other areas of the South Island were included.

Water Temperature and Trout Behavior

I’m sure the information collected will be similar across New Zealand. Here is a brief summary:

four to seven degrees

Trout thrive in deeper, slower water. Feeding is lethargic and hooked fish fight poorly. There is little insect activity. Rainbows are more active than browns. Warm weather increases trout activity. The lake trout is deep.

seven to ten degrees

Trout hold more in the eye of pits, drop-offs, halfway lies and near banks. Insect feeding and behavior increase. The fish fight better and begin to use the shallow waters.

ten to fifteen degrees

Trout feed well in the shallows and on the surface. Insects are active with the hatching of mayflies and caddisflies. The fish fight aggressively.

Fifteen to eighteen degrees

Trout hold in faster runs and halfway lies. Insect feeding and activity occurs more at night, in the morning, or during fresh egg laying. Rainbows are deeper, with browns being more active. Once a fish is hooked, the fight ends quickly.

Many trout spotted in the shallows during the day are inactive. There is less surface feeding.

Eighteen to twenty-four degrees

Trout hold up in deep, heavy water. Insect feeding and activity slow down during the day. Prime fish eat small fish at night. Old or small fish are running or along the edges. The lake trout are deep or navigate on the drop-offs.

Seaweed grows in the shallows. The fish migrate to cooler places such as headwaters, river mouths and springs, and downstream to deeper areas of lakes. Browns are more active than rainbows. Catching and releasing fish quickly is essential to their survival.

On average, water temperatures are higher from January to early March, but weather conditions can change things quickly. Here are some examples :

Early in the season, warm weather can increase water temperatures in rain-fed streams, but it can also melt snow to cool large rivers and lakes. Sudden rain after a long period of heat can flood rivers with rain and dirty water, pushing trout deep.

Regular rains can lower water temperatures by cooling the earth and air, also filling underground water reservoirs and expelling cold water. The rivers that drain the lakes heat up very quickly in hot weather. Lake water temperatures are lower during strong winds, creating wind corridors and upwellings.

Clear, cold nights cool the water quickly. Water temperature is undoubtedly a major factor in trout behavior. Understanding this will help the angler locate fish and select the most productive fishing method to catch them.

Gathering a basic knowledge of water temperature changes in your local waters is easy and can lead to the discovery of some interesting trout secrets. Naturally, to do this, it becomes necessary to understand how to use your thermometer.

In a river, always take the temperature of water up to your knees and moderately moving. I attach my thermometer to the end of my rod, my boots or my landing net. Give it several minutes before saving. In lakes, use your cane holding the thermometer in the water up to your waist. This method will give you good averages of recordings in waters where fly fishing is mainly practiced.

Water Temperature and Trout Behavior – Barometric Pressure

I used to believe that the effects of barometric pressure on trout behavior were old fisherman’s tales. But my own experiences and records tell me differently.

I don’t know if barometric pressure directly affects trout or other aspects of the food chain environment first. But the most common reactions seen in trout to a falling barometer include reduced feeding activity and fish that are more easily disturbed and harder to approach.

Sometimes the trout seem to sleep, only moving when they are pricked by a rod tip.

When pressure is low for a period of time, trout activity remains slow, but occasionally trout feed actively, albeit briefly.

Many unproductive fishing days have been spared a sudden five-minute feeding frenzy triggered by what, I don’t know, but such opportunities are welcome.

Have you ever seen a trout suddenly jump out of the water for no apparent reason? The elders told me it was a sign that it was raining. It’s hard to believe when the sky is cloudless, but it’s true. I have witnessed this many times and usually the pressure drops and a front comes shortly after.

Brown trout are the most affected by the drop in barometric pressure, often disappearing altogether at the same time, although rainbow trout feed confidently. Other times you will only catch undersized trout. At spawning time, you will only catch undersized trout.

The low pressure encourages trout to move upstream or congregate at the mouths of rivers – sea or lake – waiting for a cool one.

An increase in barometric pressure heralds improved weather and rivers, resulting in active and confident trout. They remain active until the pressure drops or other influences such as temperature change the behavior of the trout.

Sportinglife Turangi, Umpqua flow thermometer.

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Malaysian elections live: Ex-PM Muhyiddin claims victory and seeks coalition partners https://vintagetype.com/malaysian-elections-live-ex-pm-muhyiddin-claims-victory-and-seeks-coalition-partners/ Sat, 19 Nov 2022 16:31:00 +0000 https://vintagetype.com/malaysian-elections-live-ex-pm-muhyiddin-claims-victory-and-seeks-coalition-partners/ KUALA LUMPUR — Malaysians voted in a crucial election on Saturday, with several parties neck and neck amid headwinds from the global economy. Nearly 1,000 candidates, the oldest of whom is 97-year-old former Prime Minister Mahathir Mohamad, are vying for 221 seats in parliament. The latest polls showed that none of the three main camps […]]]>

KUALA LUMPUR — Malaysians voted in a crucial election on Saturday, with several parties neck and neck amid headwinds from the global economy.

Nearly 1,000 candidates, the oldest of whom is 97-year-old former Prime Minister Mahathir Mohamad, are vying for 221 seats in parliament. The latest polls showed that none of the three main camps were on track to win at least half the seats, possibly prompting a scramble for alliances to form a government.

The opposition Hope Pact led by longtime leadership aspirant Anwar Ibrahim is aiming to reclaim the mandate it won in 2018, which was wrested from it by the outgoing National Front following unprecedented political manoeuvring. The National Front’s nucleus, Prime Minister Ismail Sabri Yaakob’s United Malays National Organization (UMNO), sees the loss as a blow in its otherwise unbroken run for power since independence.

Voting ended at 6 p.m. local time, with results expected to crystallize in the early hours of Sunday.

Read our full coverage.

See also

Malaysian party leaders play down electoral chances as polls close

Here are the latest updates (local time):

3h20 National Alliance coalition leader Muhyiddin Yassin says his alliance will form the next government together with other parties. The National Alliance, which has won 70 seats so far, is expected to work with the National Front, which has 30 seats, and the Borneo parties, which have won 31 seats so far. Muhyiddin, however, did not commit to any agreement with any party and added that all negotiations will be completed by Sunday evening.

3h15 Anwar wins the seat of Tambun in the northern state of Perak by 3,736 votes. He defeated former federal minister Faizal Azumu, who represented the National Alliance coalition.

2am The electoral commission reports that of the 222 seats in the running, the National Alliance led by former Prime Minister Muhyiddin Yassin is in the lead with 62 seats, ahead of the 61 of the Pact of Hope led by Anwar Ibrahim. The ruling National Front has so far claimed 26 seats. .

12:00 p.m. The Pact of Hope led by Anwar Ibrahim officially won 28 seats and is seen leading in 65 constituencies, while the National Alliance led by former leader Muhyiddin Yassin was declared the winner in 26 seats while leading in 43 seats. The ruling National Front wins 15 seats and leads to 18 seats.

11:50 p.m. Former Prime Minister Mahathir Mohamad failed to defend his parliamentary seat in Langkawi, an unofficial tally confirms. He lost his deposit after failing to obtain at least 20% of the votes cast.

Malaysia’s former Prime Minister Mahathir Mohamad shows his inked finger after casting his vote in the country’s general election in Alor Setar, Kedah, Malaysia on November 19. © Reuters

Mahathir, 97, who served as the country’s prime minister twice for a cumulative 24 years, trailed the National Alliance winner by more than 11,000 votes.

This is Mahathir’s first defeat in the legislative elections since 1969. He was running for his 10th term as a federal legislator.

Mahathir told Nikkei Asia in a recent interview that he would retire if he lost his seat.

Meanwhile, aspiring Prime Minister Anwar Ibrahim, who leads the Hope Pact coalition, won Tambun constituency in northern Perak state by more than 4,100 votes, according to an unofficial tally. He defeated former federal minister Faizal Azumu, who represented the National Alliance coalition.

10:35 p.m. National Alliance Chairman and former Prime Minister Muhyiddin Yassin wins the seat of Pagoh in the southern state of Johor, state news agency Bernama reports.

Meanwhile, an unofficial tally shows Anwar Ibrahim’s Pact of Hope leading in 64 constituencies, the National Alliance led by Muhyiddin leading in 39 constituencies and the National Front, which includes UMNO, in the lead. with 19 seats.

9:20 p.m. The Pact of Hope led by Anwar Ibrahim is seen as leading in 54 constituencies, while the National Alliance led by former leader Muhyiddin Yassin is leading in 37, based on unofficial figures. The ruling National Front is seen lagging behind, with an advantage in just 17 constituencies. Vote counting continues and is at various stages across the country.

8:20 p.m. The Pact of Hope led by Anwar Ibrahim leads in 47 constituencies, while the National Front leads in 13. The constituencies are at different stages of counting.

Unofficial results come from respective state polling centers, where official numbers will not be announced until after all votes are concluded in a precinct.

7:00 p.m. The latest turnout data, at 4 p.m., shows a ratio of 70%, or 14.8 million voters.

A ballot box arrives at a counting center in Subang Jaya, Selangor, Malaysia on November 19. © Reuters

6:00 p.m. It’s time for the polls to close. Now let’s wait for the results to come in.

The ballot boxes will be sealed by officials of the Electoral Commission and transported to the counting centers. Each parliamentary constituency will have a counting centre.

At 3 p.m., turnout was 65%, or 13.7 million people.

5:25 p.m. The electoral commission has suspended voting in Baram, on the island of Borneo, due to bad weather. This means the total number of seats up for grabs on Saturday will be 220, down from the original 222. A separate polling date will be announced in due course for Baram as well as Padang Serai, where voting has been postponed until next month due to the sudden death of a candidate.

3:55 p.m. Some Malaysians took the opportunity to participate in role-playing games, showing up to vote dressed as superheroes like Captain America, Predator, Iron Man and Power Rangers.

3:50 p.m. More than 12.2 million voters had voted by 2 p.m., or 58% of all eligible.

3:45 p.m. Participation is a key factor to monitor. Another is how young citizens vote. As many as 1.4 million of the 21.17 million eligible voters are first-timers, after the minimum age was lowered from 21 to 18.

2:15 p.m. The electoral commission indicates that 50% of voters had voted at 1 p.m., a slower pace than in 2018 when the percentage was at the same time of 55%. However, this year the voter base is larger and the number of voters casting their ballots at 1 p.m. was 10.5 million, up from 8.22 million four years ago.

2:00 p.m. The Department of Meteorology is warning of thunderstorms and heavy rain in the southern state of Johor and parts of Sabah state on the island of Borneo.

Acting Prime Minister Ismail Sabri Yaakob and his wife voted in Bera, Pahang state on November 19. © Reuters

1:50 p.m. The country’s electoral commission tweets that as of noon, 42% of voters had voted. The participation rate in the last federal election, in 2018, was 82%.

1:20 p.m. Skies over the capital are clearing after an early morning drizzle, but local media are reporting voters in the interior of Sarawak state, Borneo, are braving floodwaters to cast their ballots.

Malaysian opposition leader Anwar Ibrahim shows his ballot before casting his vote at a polling station in Seberang Perai, Penang state, November 19. © AP

1:00 p.m. Former Prime Ministers Mahathir Mohamad and Muhyiddin Yassin show up at their polling stations to vote.

11:10 a.m. Anwar Ibrahim, who leads the opposition Hope Pact coalition, arrives at a polling center in Penang state and votes alongside many other citizens. Ismail Sabri Yaakob, Prime Minister and Deputy Chairman of the ruling UMNO, is also seen voting in Bera, Pahang state.

8:00 a.m. Election day is underway as polling stations are fully open. A key question is how the monsoon season might affect participation. The Meteorological Department gave a mixed forecast for Election Day, with rain expected in parts of the country.

Women show their inked fingers after voting at a polling center in Kuala Lumpur on November 19. (Photo by Hakimie Amrie)

07:00 Pollster Merdeka Center for Opinion Research, in its latest poll on Friday, predicted the opposition Hope Pact coalition would lead with 82 seats, out of 221, followed by the National Alliance with 43. UMNO is expected to get 15 seats, 45 of which are considered a toss up.

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A kayaker discovers the remains of a landfill at Colonial Beach https://vintagetype.com/a-kayaker-discovers-the-remains-of-a-landfill-at-colonial-beach/ Thu, 17 Nov 2022 02:00:00 +0000 https://vintagetype.com/a-kayaker-discovers-the-remains-of-a-landfill-at-colonial-beach/ James Hall retired earlier this year and purchased a waterfront mobile home in Colonial Beach where he relishes life on Monroe Creek. “I’m surrounded by beautiful views,” he said, looking out the sliding glass doors of his bedroom. From his vantage point, he regularly sees bald eagles flying overhead. In fact, one took to the […]]]>

James Hall retired earlier this year and purchased a waterfront mobile home in Colonial Beach where he relishes life on Monroe Creek.

“I’m surrounded by beautiful views,” he said, looking out the sliding glass doors of his bedroom.

From his vantage point, he regularly sees bald eagles flying overhead. In fact, one took to the air as soon as a Free Lance-Star reporter and photographer arrived at his Westmoreland County home.

A brood of swans hatched from a nearby nest this spring and Hall jokes that they “need a runway like a 747” to take off. He marvels at the sound their wingtips make as they strike against the water, increasing their momentum to lift their bodies 20 or 30 pounds into the air.

Colonial Beach resident James Hall found trash along the banks of Monroe Creek and fought to have it cleaned up.



But as Hall, 69, followed the winding curves of Monroe Creek — which feeds into Greater Monroe Bay and eventually the Potomac River and Chesapeake Bay — he encountered horror and potential health hazard.

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In the shallower parts of the creek, the banks are encrusted with glass bottles of various shapes and sizes. Some once held sodas, pickles, or liquid cleansers; they are brown, blue, and white with wide mouths, jug handles, or serrated edges.

Further downstream are piles of rusted metal, carcasses of old appliances, bottles that probably contained propane, and cans of paint thrown on the ground. There are even a few decrepit vehicles on the higher banks, their railings and chassis cutting through the underbrush.

From a kayak in the creek, it’s hard to see anything lurking along the banks.

“It makes me sick to watch it,” Hall said, pointing to the stakes. “I couldn’t honestly ignore it because I have kids, grandkids, neighbors, everyone comes here.”

Hall did not keep silent about his discovery. He asked questions of longtime residents, filed a formal complaint with Westmoreland County and spoke with Robin Schick, Mayor of Colonial Beach.

Here’s the situation: At the time, the city operated a landfill, not far from the creek and the birthplace of James Monroe, said Norm Risavi, Westmoreland County Administrator for 30 years.

The makeshift landfill was not used in its day, but before the days of strict environmental regulations and lined landfills, people would go to a remote location and dump their trash. Hall thinks they probably started at the edge of Monroe Creek and came back. The elders told him they remembered visiting the dump up to 70 years ago.

Over time, some of the waste has settled into the ground. As the creek banks eroded, the encrusted bottles surfaced.

In mid-October, Hall raised concerns about waste and possible water contamination with the Westmoreland Land Use Office. He spoke with three people over the next two weeks, then contacted the newspaper when he did not receive a follow-up call.

Risavi checked with his staff after the newspaper contacted him, and he contacted Hall. Hall invited him to take a kayak ride and see for himself – just as he showed the newspaper staff – but Risavi is recovering from a knee injury and couldn’t risk a boat ride .

The two determined that the trashcan Hall saw was part of the landfill and was on 27 acres owned by the City of Colonial Beach.

A Westmoreland ordinance allows him to notify property owners who have piles of trash on their property. If they don’t comply and clean up the mess, the county will and add the cost to the person’s tax bill, Risavi said. But because the city is tax-exempt, as are all local governments, the ordinance does not apply in this case, he added.

The same day he met Hall, Risavi contacted the Virginia Department of Environmental Quality to see if there were any grants that could help the city clean up. A DEQ official is making arrangements to view the property, Risavi said Wednesday.

“It’s not something a few thousand dollars will fix,” he said.

He also contacted an engineering firm to take water samples from the area. Like Hall, he worries about what might be there. Samples passed in Monroe Bay showed polychlorinated biphenyls, or PCBs, Risavi said. They are highly carcinogenic chemical compounds, formerly used in industrial and consumer products. Their production was banned in 1979 by the Environmental Protection Agency.

“I think the important thing is to do sampling and have a clear picture of what happens if there are contaminants,” Risavi said. “I know in the past we’ve wondered whether or not some of this could leak out of this old landfill. It’s hard to say what was thrown in there.

Schick, the mayor of Colonial Beach, said she was familiar with some of the trash found by Hall, but did not go further into Monroe Creek, where the largest piles are. About a decade ago, she and Mitzi Saffos, owner of Colonial Beach Brewing, started a local Save the Bay campaign in Colonial Beach because of their mutual concern about water quality.

The two arranged for groups of Marines to come and attack part of the mess at Monroe Creek. They focused on the area across from the Monroe Bay mobile home park where Hall lives. The Marines worked from their kayaks and dumped bottles and other trash which they dislodged into a pontoon boat.

The day’s effort produced a lot of bric-a-brac and the workers had muddy hands and boots but barely made a dent.

“We felt a bit defeated because there was still a lot to do,” Schick said.

Over the next few years, she said the Save the Bay campaign focused on more accessible areas.

Schick said there are questions about property lines, old records and who owns what, but there’s no need to quibble over those details.

“We have to do everything we can to protect our ecosystem here because we depend on it vitally, our economy depends on it, our food depends on it,” she said. “We want to have clean waterways and healthy fisheries.

Westmoreland officials also contacted Schick after Hall and Risavi met. There’s talk of collaborating on another living shoreline project similar to what the county and city did on Robin Grove Lane, “another place that had landfill issues a long time ago,” Schick said.

The project included DEQ grants and technical assistance from the Virginia Institute of Marine Science.

While it’s unclear if a similar oyster clean-up and restoration project would work in Monroe Creek, one thing is clear: Hall won’t let the trash heaps ruin the retirement home he loves.

Like some of the bottles he discovered, Hall was shattered when he moved to the water after divorce separated him from three of his seven children. As he got to know his older neighbors, he began to “drive Miss Daisy”, taking four women and two men to doctor’s appointments or to the grocery store.

He thought it was God’s purpose in moving it to Monroe Creek, but when he saw the piles of trash along the water, he took on a secondary cause.

“This is like a mission now,” Hall said. “I can’t let this go until it’s cleaned up.”

Cathy Dyson: 540/374-5425

cdyson@freelancestar.com

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Part-time a problem? A 40-hour week was not ordained by God https://vintagetype.com/part-time-a-problem-a-40-hour-week-was-not-ordained-by-god/ Mon, 14 Nov 2022 07:24:25 +0000 https://vintagetype.com/part-time-a-problem-a-40-hour-week-was-not-ordained-by-god/ Photo: Depositphotos.com Our regular columnist Molly Quell is tired of hearing all the talk about part-time work in the Netherlands. She says 40 hours a week is not ordained by God, and pay is not the only reason people don’t work full time. Against all my best judgment, I have repeatedly allowed myself to be […]]]>

Photo: Depositphotos.com

Our regular columnist Molly Quell is tired of hearing all the talk about part-time work in the Netherlands. She says 40 hours a week is not ordained by God, and pay is not the only reason people don’t work full time.

Against all my best judgment, I have repeatedly allowed myself to be drawn into debates about the country’s “part-time” work crisis. In group discussions, on Twitter, at the table. The argument goes like this: the Netherlands has a labor shortage. Many people in the Netherlands work part-time, supported by social benefits. If these people worked full time, our problems would be solved.

“Insert the full-time premium, because our labor market is down,” says the FD. “The economy is being stuck in the mud,‘ wrote D66 MP Jan Paternotte on Twitter, demanding a full-time bonus.

A full-time bonus

A proposal currently under consideration provides for a 5% salary bonus for people in the education sector working part-time to move to full-time work. But many argue for such a bonus to be offered more widely.

While people with job titles like “economist” and “member of parliament” seem to like the idea, many don’t.

And I know this will shock many Dutch people, but they are not the only country on the planet experiencing a labor shortage. In fact, most of Europe, the United States, Australia, Singapore, the list goes on, have more jobs than workers. And these places don’t have a part-time work culture.

It is true that the Dutch are more likely to work part-time than their European counterparts. The dirty little secret that no one wants to mention is that the Dutch also have a higher labor force participation rate than the rest of Europe.

While around 57% of the working population in Italy, Greece and Belgium are employed, the Dutch lead the EU with 67%.

When you choose to work part-time, many people give up their jobs altogether. I’m not a fanciful FD columnist, but that seems like one thing that would make the labor shortage worse.

more than salary

While how much you earn certainly contributes to how much you’re willing to work, salary isn’t the only factor. Your own health, desire, need to care for young children or aging parents, and many other factors come into play when deciding how many hours to work. (If that’s a choice, but more on that later.)

A recent survey by the government’s socio-cultural think tank SCP shows that a full-time bonus will not encourage more women to work full-time. As I write this column, schoolchildren in the Netherlands are going away for a week to herfstvakantie. Most schools operate from 8:30 a.m. to 3 p.m., with half days on Wednesdays. They are closed for at least six weeks in the summer.

Those aren’t full-time hours, and it turns out you can’t let your eight-year-old go wild until you get home from work at 6 p.m. There is also a shortage of child care spaces and after-school child care spaces. Personally, I know four parents who would like to work more days per week but cannot because there is no childcare option available for their child.

In 2021, then-Health Minister Hugo de Jonge asked the Netherlands Institute for Human Rights about options to encourage desperately needed healthcare workers to increase their hours during the pandemic.

The answer? Full-time bonuses, increased hourly bonuses and a range of other measures were, according to the board, discriminatory. Since women are stuck with more household chores, they will be less able to take advantage of these programs, and that is discrimination.

What is full time anyway?

Generally, when someone says full time, it means 40 hours of work per week. This number, however, is not ordained by God. This is the number of unions that have managed to fight to meet the standard.

A century ago, it was common to work 10 hours a day, six days a week. There is no reason for the base company to run around 40 hours. The famous economist John Maynard Keynes predicted that we would all work only 15 hours a week by 2030.

According to the CBS National Bureau of Statistics, full-time work is a job of more than 35 hours per week. In the Netherlands, civil servants are considered full-time if they work 36 hours. The OECD sets full-time at more than 30 hours per week.

If you only have Friday afternoon off, working those few extra hours won’t earn you a bonus. You are already considered full-time.

part time princesses

The ugly talk turns its nose up at so-called part-time princesses who work three days a week, presumably in marketing, and spend the rest of their time taking yoga classes and drinking oat milk lattes .

It is true that many more women than men work part-time in the Netherlands. Coincidentally, those working part-time are likely to work in health care and education, jobs that are traditionally held by underpaid, overworked women convinced of dragging themselves into poor conditions due to the importance and necessity of their work.

In fact, cashiers are the occupation most likely to work part-time. Teachers and nurses have been complaining about low pay and poor working conditions for years. Their salaries are paid by the government. You don’t need a fancy full-time bonus plan to fix this, just give them what they’ve been asking for all along.

queens of well-being

And what about all those allegations that those of us who work full time (well, 35, 36, or 30 hours a week, depending on who you ask) are funding the lifestyles of those workers at part-timers who subsidize their income with government benefits?

It is certainly true that some of these people probably exist. But most benefits in the Netherlands are means-tested, calculations are complicated and tax rates are marginal.

The examples used by the tax office focus on a working adult and children under 12 earning a particularly low wage – the households most likely to receive subsidies for rent and health care. For very obvious reasons, it is also households that struggle the most to manage a full-time job.

But these examples are all situations that are probably temporary. Parents receive fewer benefits as their children get older, wages rise as unions negotiate better collective agreements, and subsidies and tax rates are constantly changing. The idea that a single parent making $28,000 a year somehow spends an awful lot of time gambling on the exact hours they should be working to maximize their income is absurd.

Can people work more?

All of this dithering assumes that people who work part-time have the option of working full-time and are choosing not to. According to CBS, almost half a million people in the Netherlands would like more hours, but they are not available.

Just because there is a general labor shortage does not mean that every employer is desperate for workers. In fact, many positions are designed to be 32 or 28 hours per week. Many companies, for example, only need a graphic designer three days a week. There is simply no demand for more.

While I’ve taken years of my life to argue with people about this, the job market mostly seems to be fixing itself. Unemployment has climbed to 3.8% since its low in April. As the number of people looking for work increases, the shortage of employees decreases.

In fact, employers are now expressing concern about diseases causing shortages. According to health and safety body Arboned, around 4.3% of workers were on sick leave in September and these figures are higher in healthcare and education, where around 5.7% of workers were absent .

Maybe instead of complaining about women in tough, low-paying jobs ruining the economy, the Dutch should start encouraging flu shots.

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NHL Buzz: Carlson decision in game time for Capitals https://vintagetype.com/nhl-buzz-carlson-decision-in-game-time-for-capitals/ Fri, 11 Nov 2022 18:19:39 +0000 https://vintagetype.com/nhl-buzz-carlson-decision-in-game-time-for-capitals/ Welcome to the NHL Buzz. The 2022-23 regular season is underway and NHL.com brings you all the latest news. Washington Capitals John Carlson will be the decision of the game for the Capitals when they host the Tampa Bay Lightning on Friday (7 p.m. ET; NHLN, SNE, SNW, SNP, NBCSWA, BSSUN, SN NOW). The defender […]]]>

Welcome to the NHL Buzz. The 2022-23 regular season is underway and NHL.com brings you all the latest news.

Washington Capitals

John Carlson will be the decision of the game for the Capitals when they host the Tampa Bay Lightning on Friday (7 p.m. ET; NHLN, SNE, SNW, SNP, NBCSWA, BSSUN, SN NOW).

The defender missed six games with a lower body injury.

“After every time he skates we have to wait a bit to see how he reacts, so right now it’s a game time decision,” said assistant Kevin McCarthy, who will be the coach- chief Friday with Peter Laviolette in NHL COVID-19 protocol.

Carlson hasn’t played since suffering the injury in the first period against the Nashville Predators on Oct. 29. He has six points (two goals, four assists) in nine games this season.

“It was kind of a weird game,” Carlson said after morning practice. “I turned around and stopped at the same time…I feel a lot better. I feel really good now and just trying to make sure I’m doing the right things on the way back.”

Defender Dmitry Orlov participated in morning practice but will miss his third straight game with a lower-body injury.

Laviolette will miss at least the next two games after entering the NHL’s COVID-19 protocol on Thursday.

“He has no real symptoms,” McCarthy said. “He feels good, but obviously he’s in protocol.” –Tom Gulitti

Florida Panthers

Aaron Ekblad will return for the Panthers against the Edmonton Oilers on Saturday (4 p.m. ET; SN, BSFL, ESPN+, SN NOW).

“You want your best defender in your lineup for that one, don’t you?” Panthers coach Paul Maurice said Friday. “So we were pretty happy that time went the way it did because we’re going to have to skate very, very well. And even if you skate very well, that still won’t be enough for the two very special players (Connor McDavid, Leon Draisaitl) that [I] used to see a lot of them in Winnipeg. And they are worth watching.”

The defender, who was placed on injured reserve with a lower-body injury on October 19, has missed the last 11 games with a lower-body injury. Florida was 6-4-1 without Ekblad.

“Extremely excited,” Ekblad said. “These things are the worst. Sitting outside [stinks], but I’m really proud of the way the team played. Some guys stepped up in big ways. And you saw their true colors from the quality of some of the players on this team. So it was fun to watch. It will be even more fun to get back in action.”

Ekblad, who left in the second period of a 5-3 loss to the Boston Bruins on Oct. 17, has one goal in three games this season. He will skate in pair with Marc Stael against the Oilers.

“I’m really happy with how we survived this injury,” Maurice said. “I would never tell you that I was worried about it, but you take [Ekblad] out of your range…we lost it in [the third game of the season]. He’s such an important part of what we’re doing right now. So I was worried. And I’m really happy. We also learned a whole bunch of things along the way. … It was a good experience, but we don’t need to relive it.” –Alain Poupart

Carolina Hurricanes

Frederic Andersen is out for the Hurricanes with a lower-body injury, and his return is unclear.

“I’m not going to say week after week because I don’t know,” coach Rod Brind’Amour said Thursday. “He won’t be back tomorrow.
Andersen, who was injured in practice Tuesday, is 5-3-0 with a 2.72 GAA and .891 save percentage in eight games. He made 18 saves in a 3-1 loss to the Toronto Maple Leafs on Sunday.

“He’s just a little behind. He changed something in training (Tuesday),” Brind’Amour said. “The keepers are weird. If you don’t feel 100 per cent, it’s hard to go.”

Andersen suffered a torn MCL on April 16 and missed the rest of last season, including the Stanley Cup Playoffs, when the Hurricanes lost to the New York Rangers in seven games in the Conference Second Round. ballast.

Brind’Amour said he wasn’t sure Andersen would travel for a two-game road trip that begins at the Colorado Avalanche on Saturday.

Piotr Kochetkov allowed two goals on 22 shots in a 7-2 win over the Edmonton Oilers on Thursday, and Antti Raanta served as a backup.

Kotchetkov was recalled from Chicago of the American Hockey League on Tuesday and backed Raanta in a 3-0 loss to the Florida Panthers on Wednesday.

Raanta is 3-1-1 in five starts this season with a 2.36 GAA and .915 save percentage. Kochetkov was 3-0-0 with a 2.42 GAA and .902 save percentage in three NHL games last season. –Kurt Dusterberg

Vancouver Canucks

Tanner Pearson will be out 4-6 weeks after undergoing hand surgery, the Canucks announced Thursday.

The forward, who was placed on the injured list, sat out the third period of a 5-2 loss to the Montreal Canadiens on Wednesday.
Pearson has five points (one goal, four assists) in 14 games this season, averaging 13:30 of ice time.

Forward Sheldon dry was recalled from Abbotsford of the American Hockey League. He has one assist in four games with the Canucks this season.

The Canucks next play the Toronto Maple Leafs on Saturday (7 p.m. ET; CBC, SNO, SNW, SNP, ESPN+, SN NOW).

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“Say hello, Willie Mays!” review: On the wonderful HBO doc, the superstar leaves the praise to others https://vintagetype.com/say-hello-willie-mays-review-on-the-wonderful-hbo-doc-the-superstar-leaves-the-praise-to-others/ Tue, 08 Nov 2022 23:53:00 +0000 https://vintagetype.com/say-hello-willie-mays-review-on-the-wonderful-hbo-doc-the-superstar-leaves-the-praise-to-others/ We all love those viral videos that show Mike Trout of the Angels and Mookie Betts of the Dodgers having fun with fans in the stands before a game, right? Consider that some 70 years ago, Willie Mays regularly engaged in next-level fan interaction. As we see in archival footage featured in the wonderful HBO […]]]>

We all love those viral videos that show Mike Trout of the Angels and Mookie Betts of the Dodgers having fun with fans in the stands before a game, right?

Consider that some 70 years ago, Willie Mays regularly engaged in next-level fan interaction. As we see in archival footage featured in the wonderful HBO documentary “Say Hey, Willie Mays!”, when the New York Giants baseball superstar lived in Harlem in the 1950s, a few blocks from the a former Polo, he played stickball in the streets with neighborhood kids for an hour most mornings, took them to the streets for ice cream like a dapper Pied Piper – then headed to the ballpark. Can you imagine? To this day, there are probably alumni still recounting how they played stickball on the streets of Harlem with the great Willie Mays when they were young.

If you are familiar with the life and times of Willie Mays, this documentary will serve as an invaluable reminder of his greatness; if you’re only vaguely aware of its legend, this is must-watch TV. Every baseball fan and student of American history should know the story of the greatest player to ever wear a uniform: a five-tool phenomenon who was equally spectacular hitting, hitting for power, leading the bases, defensively and throwing. (Oh, and let’s not forget the signature “basket catch”. Let’s let the rest of the outfield population – past, present and future – catch flyballs the traditional way. Willie Mays put his hands down and grabbed some flies like canned vegetables knocking off a high shelf. What an amazing style!)

“Say hello, Willie Mays!”

Esteemed and prolific author and filmmaker Nelson George is to be commended not just for his flawless storytelling skills, but for landing an interview with the somewhat reclusive and private 91-year-old Mays, who talks about his love of the game and his fond memories of growing up as a baseball prodigy – but refuses to acknowledge he was the greatest of all time. To this day, that’s just not his style. The film leaves it up to others, from former costars such as Juan Marichal and Orlando Cepeda, to broadcasters such as the late Vin Scully and Bob Costas, to sing Willie’s praises.

“Say Hey” takes us through Mays’ childhood growing up in 1940s Jim Crow South Fairfield, Alabama, where he was raised primarily by two aunts. Willie’s father worked at the local steel mill, and when his shift ended in the early afternoon, he would drive to the ballpark with his son and teach him baseball. “They called [my father] ‘cat’ because he could run, he could throw and he could line up and he could hit, man,” Willie says.

Like father, like son. At the age of 17, Mays was the starting center back for the Birmingham Black Barons of the Negro American League. Jackie Robinson, who had recently crossed the color barrier at the majors, recommended the Brooklyn Dodgers sign Mays – but their scout reported that Willie couldn’t hit the curve (oops) and that the New York Giants would sign Mays and would assign him to their Class B affiliate in Trenton, New Jersey, where he heard vicious insults from some fans. “They called you all kinds of names, n—– this and n—– that,” recalls Willie, who took his father’s advice and never acknowledged the hate. “He left that on the pitch,” says Mays’ son, Michael.

Mays has encountered racism throughout her career. In 1958, the Giants moved to San Francisco. As former mayor Willie Brown recounts, it was a time when if you were black, “you couldn’t be a policeman, you couldn’t be a firefighter, you couldn’t live in certain parts of town.” When Mays and his then-wife tried to buy a house on Miraloma Drive, they were initially turned down, solely because of their race.

Willie Mays (pictured in 1964) says in ‘Say Hey’ he encountered racism during his baseball career.

Still, Mays remained a publicly upbeat, uncontroversial presence — guesting on TV shows such as “Bewitched,” “The Donna Reed Show” and “What’s My Line?”, never turning down an autograph request and keeping her point of view for himself as he racked up one sensational season after another en route to breaking Mel Ott’s all-time National League record.

Mays was deeply hurt when Jackie Robinson publicly criticized him for not being a public voice for civil rights and joining Jim Brown, Muhammad Ali, Bill Russell and Arthur Ashe on the front lines of the fight, but Willie responded by saying : “In my own way, I think I’m helping. Joe Morgan, Hank Aaron, Frank Robinson and Maury Wills were among the many black players who came to Mays’ defense, citing his behind-the-scenes efforts to help and support them. (Mays’ godson, Barry Bonds, also speaks eloquently and emotionally about Mays’ impact on him throughout his life. The doc doesn’t get into Bonds scandals, and doesn’t need to; we all know that story.)

Most of the time, however, “Say Hey” is a celebration of a player who was so special, so talented that he would have a place on Mount Rushmore of the all-time greats.

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Random Incursions | The eternal buzz of the Indian market https://vintagetype.com/random-incursions-the-eternal-buzz-of-the-indian-market/ Sat, 05 Nov 2022 19:34:38 +0000 https://vintagetype.com/random-incursions-the-eternal-buzz-of-the-indian-market/ Marketplaces in urban India have largely metamorphosed into glitzy malls or mini-supermarkets these days. Yet the traditional, earthy, rustic, weekly sabzi mandis and rehri markets continue to thrive, thrive and proliferate. The small vendor has learned the ropes of modern payment methods and has even adopted scanners and UPI numbers, to ensure that no customer […]]]>

Marketplaces in urban India have largely metamorphosed into glitzy malls or mini-supermarkets these days. Yet the traditional, earthy, rustic, weekly sabzi mandis and rehri markets continue to thrive, thrive and proliferate.

The small vendor has learned the ropes of modern payment methods and has even adopted scanners and UPI numbers, to ensure that no customer strays from their booth. The competitive nature of the markets has not seen any changes, and if so, the scenario has become even more edgy.

During recent visits to traditional towns like Ranchi, Varanasi and Pune, I experienced the sights, sounds, smells and tastes of traditional bazaars after many years. While wandering aimlessly one morning, I found myself surrounded by several fruit, vegetable and street vendors. The sheer variety of wares, colors, smells and textures before me and thousands of other visitors was breathtaking and utterly exciting.

An old lady with glasses, who looked rather poor and possibly from a tribal community, caught my eye. His “shop” consisted of a small cloth and a makeshift blanket. It was the home, temporarily, of some gooseberries, peanuts, English apples and her.

A quick analysis of the situation told me that her slightly better-equipped and more business-savvy neighbors would kill and leave her behind. Not a single customer seemed interested in his rate. Acting as a manna from heaven wasn’t on my to-do list that morning, but I was happy to buy her some stuff and leave her some encouraging words. Although she barely understood me, she smiled slightly and I felt a little fired up that I had improved her spell, however slightly.

The endless hustle, bustle and buzz of traditional markets across India cannot be replicated by any seven star mall. Prominently there will be peddlers, gawkers, time wasters, serious shoppers, entertainers, juice wallahs, serious sellers, opportunists, cops and thieves too. Sometimes there will be cacophony and chaos. There will be bored children and spouses. Stray cattle, captive horses and doggies of all kinds may also be present. Haggling, jostling, arguing, scolding, smiling and even romance are some of the common activities that will prevail in these bazaars. An avid writer will easily find plenty to savor, paint and describe.

Yet the high-flying mall culture has also made its mark. Unassuming malls can be found even in the smallest towns. Large, high-end malls usually appear in metropolises. The pure flavor of human dynamism that is palpable in an old-fashioned market will take time to develop into these gigantic monsters, however. With the exception of the creamiest layer, everyone will frequent these malls, to splurge, to dine, or to date. But without the Indian vibe, which this column mentioned earlier, malls will remain antiseptic palaces detached from innate Indianness.

Americanism has been an essential component of these malls from the beginning. Aunts and uncles who have never tasted bagels before will nod when their offspring offer them. But something tells me they prefer to enjoy kachauri chana down the road! Yes, the mega malls attempt to offer all the traditional Indian offerings, but the roadside kulchas at Shyam ji will still be beaten!

The coexistence of the modern and the traditional is always the key to the evolution of humanity. Yes, the ancients like the postman, the telephone operator, the banker and the delivery man have seen their ways of working radically change, but tradition cannot be entirely replaced by modernity.

The economy is very dependent on small and medium-sized enterprises or MSMEs which often continue to thrive on age-old mores and ways of working. Hopefully the smallest shopkeepers, fruit sellers or gol gappa wallahs won’t be shattered by the gargantuan wave of technology-enabled commercialization.

The ordinary Indian, the man still on the street, even the delivery man Zomato, must be able to dream and prosper in his own way. By allowing smaller businesses to thrive, India will do just that.

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Tour introduces the history of Fort Macleod’s cemeteries https://vintagetype.com/tour-introduces-the-history-of-fort-macleods-cemeteries/ Wed, 02 Nov 2022 22:34:42 +0000 https://vintagetype.com/tour-introduces-the-history-of-fort-macleods-cemeteries/ Local historian George Kush shared some of his knowledge about Fort Macleod’s cemeteries and characters on Thursday. At left is Holly Williams, whose idea was for the Fort Macleod Library to host the visit. Twenty-one people braved a strong gale Thursday night to hear the story of Fort Macleod’s cemeteries. Local historian George Kush also […]]]>

Twenty-one people braved a strong gale Thursday night to hear the story of Fort Macleod’s cemeteries.

Local historian George Kush also spoke about some of the earliest figures buried in the cemeteries during his presentation hosted by the Fort Macleod Library.

Kush explained that Fort Macleod’s first cemetery was located on the island in the Oldman River where the North West Mounted Police had their first fort.

When spring flooding proved to be a problem, the Royal Mounted Police were granted permission to move into what is now known as the 1884 North West Mounted Police Barracks Provincial Historic Site, at the west end of town.

A new cemetery has been created where the Subway Restaurant is located.

Eventually, the city of Fort Macleod was granted permission to establish Union Cemetery where it currently stands.

The Holy Cross Cemetery was also established at its current location at the same time.

Kush told people the location of the Union Cemetery pioneer area.

This area in the northern part of the cemetery contains the graves of early residents, including buffalo hunters, settlers, townspeople, and businessmen.

The wooden crosses and bollards have deteriorated from the elements and the identity of the people buried there has been lost over time.

Kush also explained that early Chinese residents of Fort Macleod were not allowed to be buried in Christian or Catholic cemeteries, due to prejudice at the time.

A section called “The Chinese Cemetery” was pointed out to those on the tour.

Kush spoke about some of the people buried in the cemetery, including legendary mounted police scout Jerry Potts and his son.

Kush also told the story of two North West Mounted Police officers who ignored the advice of elders and set off for Fort Kipp, only to be caught in a blizzard.

They were found frozen to death on the prairie when the storm subsided.

Another story involved a cowboy known as Fred the Ratter, who had indeed been employed by his parents in their rat-hunting business in England.

Kush has a wealth of information about the area and its people, but had to save much of it for another, hopefully quieter day.

People were invited to Stronghold Brewery to sample a special beer unveiled Thursday after the presentation.

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Mississippi River scenes show hope and frustration over drought https://vintagetype.com/mississippi-river-scenes-show-hope-and-frustration-over-drought/ Sun, 30 Oct 2022 11:36:28 +0000 https://vintagetype.com/mississippi-river-scenes-show-hope-and-frustration-over-drought/ In the fall, the downtown economic engine is fully deployed along the roads up and down the river, where flat, fertile land stretches out to the horizon. Mile after mile, against a backdrop of changing leaves, farmers harvest endless rows of golden soybeans and corn, their tractors shrouded in clouds of dust rising from the […]]]>

In the fall, the downtown economic engine is fully deployed along the roads up and down the river, where flat, fertile land stretches out to the horizon. Mile after mile, against a backdrop of changing leaves, farmers harvest endless rows of golden soybeans and corn, their tractors shrouded in clouds of dust rising from the parched ground.

Huge grain-laden trucks rumble along narrow country roads, heading for the river and the grain elevators that buy the crops and ship them south to the Gulf of Mexico.

It’s not until you reach the river’s edge, at places like the Poinsett Rice & Grain Loading Facility, that the immediate impacts of the drought become startling and unmistakable.

“There’s probably close to $50 million here,” said Jeff Worsham, the port manager, as he stood high on a loading dock, gazing at the roughly 75 barges stranded in this small offshoot of the Mississippi.

Below, trucks loaded with soybeans from nearby farms continued to enter the grain elevator complex. But Worsham doesn’t have much room to put the crops he buys from farmers these days.

With restrictions on the number of barges that can travel on the river at a time, as well as limits on how much each can be loaded, the standoff isn’t expected to ease any time soon. And higher transportation costs are bound to reduce its bottom line.

Worsham’s dilemma in this corner of Mississippi is a microcosm of the struggle that plays out over and over again these days.

“I’ve been here 20 years and we’ve never had this problem,” Worsham said. “Normally high tide is what causes us pain.”

Two of the facility’s loading docks were out of service that day as the water level was too low for barge loading. Nearby, Worsham pointed to huge plastic grain bags, each filled with about 30,000 bushels — or about 30 truckloads — of soybeans. He can store crops there for a while, but each day they sit carries more risk.

“It’s the first time we’ve done this,” he said.

Worsham hopes this will be the last time, but he’s not so sure. The river appears to be experiencing more violent fluctuations today than long ago, he said.

“It rises quickly and it falls quickly. It makes it difficult because you don’t know what to expect,” Worsham said. “It’s always been unpredictable, but it just seems to be more extreme than before.”

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Dhenkanal Diary: Laidback Town with a Dark Underbelly https://vintagetype.com/dhenkanal-diary-laidback-town-with-a-dark-underbelly/ Tue, 25 Oct 2022 11:56:16 +0000 https://vintagetype.com/dhenkanal-diary-laidback-town-with-a-dark-underbelly/ The nostalgic notion of Dhenkanal as a peaceful, laid-back town blissful in its picturesque surroundings takes a hit a few days after your stay here. If you’ve been away from it for decades, unaware of the changes it’s undergone, you’ll probably be shocked by the hint of violence coming from many corners. Beyond the calm […]]]>

The nostalgic notion of Dhenkanal as a peaceful, laid-back town blissful in its picturesque surroundings takes a hit a few days after your stay here. If you’ve been away from it for decades, unaware of the changes it’s undergone, you’ll probably be shocked by the hint of violence coming from many corners. Beyond the calm and placid façade of the headquarters city, the ugly presence of anarchy in many guises makes itself apparent.

Extortion, threats, drugs, bombs, guns, gangs and alcohol. When words like these dominate conversation among the younger demographic and find casual acceptance, it’s not easy to feel indifferent. Talking about “Mauser” and “powder” finds a routine place in such conversation, as does alcohol; and local hooligans are celebrated as heroes. They have learned to live with these as part of everyday reality, not something out of place in normal life. Something has changed in the city, still a village at heart but now flush with acquired urban habits. And it’s not for the best.

The Laxmi puja celebration a week ago witnessed a spiral of violence. Young people from different localities launched a fierce attack on others during the immersion procession. Physical injuries and property damage were reported. A week later, the situation remains tense in several areas. According to residents of Banawaliprasad, some members of their village fled their homes fearing being attacked by thugs in nearby towns. The police intervened to ensure the peace. But any truce here and in other regions, according to the elders, would be temporary. It is routine at every puja, they say. All plan to settle old grudges during the pujas. But the tension between the different sahis continues throughout the year.

Such conflicts are common in economically dynamic cities where competition for a slice of the prosperity pie is intense. Dhenkanal, with its nearly stagnant economy, does not exactly fit into the category of prosperous places with many opportunities for the young population. So what explains the tendency towards anarchy? “Alcohol and maybe drugs,” said an old resident. “There is too much alcohol circulating. Social inhibition towards alcohol consumption weakens. Violent behavior is just a fallout of the trend,” he explains. Alcohol may be a problem, but that doesn’t fully explain the trend.

A better explanation would be the lack of jobs. There simply aren’t enough decent-paying jobs to absorb the city’s young population and draw them away from unwanted pursuits. Moreover, the very fact that the economic cake is small, the competition for it is high. Beyond activities related to construction and land transactions, there is not much. This could lead to rivalries with the potential for violent fallout. Incidents during Laxmi puja should not be considered in isolation. It’s not just about drunken youths getting into random fights and skirmishes, it can be an expression of pent-up economic grievances that different groups have against each other.

Either way, it’s not normal, and neither is its normalization. The underground anarchy is uncomfortable for someone whose image of a serene and peaceful Dhenkanal is etched in his memory. Fear is an unwanted intruder in this space. But it is present and real. Effective policing could be a solution to this problem. Although competent, it may be insufficient. More on that later.

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